Action Briefs

Americans are demanding changes to law enforcement protocols as a response to the epidemic of police misconduct. Bills are being developed at the federal, state, and local levels, with much of the legislation pointing to the murder of George Floyd as the sentinel event for police reform.

The Center for Justice Research at Texas Southern University is playing an active role in this discussion with the formation of our National Police Reform Advisory Group, a collective of scholars, practitioners, and community members, most of whom have police training experience. The group’s recommendations for our Action Briefs calls for common sense reforms that protect citizens and hold officers accountable for misconduct at all levels.

1. Banning chokeholds

CJR is the premier criminal justice research center located on the campus of a historically Black college or university. Our scholars offer an important voice at this crucial time.

2. Duty to intervene

These alarming events of the use of deadly force in the presence of other officers who have failed to intercede have highlighted the need to better understand the nature of bystander intervention and accountability.

3. no knock warrants

The use of no-knocks has evolved and expanded over the past 25 years, implicitly redefining Americans’ 4th Amendment protection against unlawful government interference.

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Built for the future

These evidence-based and data-driven briefs include comprehensive recommendations for lawmakers, mayors, law enforcement, and other key stakeholders to consider in the advancement of police reform in their respective jurisdictions. Armed with these briefs, policymakers and practitioners can better target policies and programs that aim to improve police-community interactions for the most disadvantaged.
Beyond policy work, researchers can use the Action Briefs to reveal new insights into evidence-supported, culturally responsive approaches to police reform instead of the traditional responses that have yet to be vetted by those closest to the problem.